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Classic Porsches of the 1960’s

Classic 1960’s Porsches

An important decade for the Porsche brand, the 1960’s would see the end of the Porsche 356, which launched the company’s worldwide recognition, and would see the beginning of production for the iconic Porsche 911. The company also reached the important milestone of having 50,000 production cars in 1962, and would be the first German automaker to meet new regulations from the United States regarding safety and emissions later in the decade. With several variations of both the Porsche 356 and Porsche 911 available during this era, there are plenty of options to choose from if you’re looking for classic sports cars of the 1950’s to add to your collection.

Whether you have a particular 1960’s Porsche in mind or have just started your search for 1960’s classic cars for sale, let’s take a look at some of the different models that are available to you within the Porsche brand.

 


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Classic Porsche 356:

1961 Porsche 356After approximately 50 aluminum-bodied prototypes were designed in 1948 and 1949, the Porsche 356 would debut in 1950 and would mark the beginning of production for the company in Stuttgart. The 356 would be offered in several different variations throughout its long production run. Below is a list of the 1960’s Porsche 356 options.

 

Classic Porsche 356B:

1961 Porsche 356BDebuting in 1959 and replacing the 356A, the Porsche 356B of the 1960’s would feature exterior changes such as raised bumpers with vertical bumper guards, raised headlights, and new grilles both above and below the front bumper. Buyers often flock to the open-air driving experience of the Cabriolet, making the Coupe models a more affordable option for some buyers.

 

Classic Porsche 356C:

1964 Porsche 356CThe Porsche 356C would take the place of the 356B in 1964. Offering disc brakes, which required new hubcaps and wheels, the Porsche 356C models of the 1960’s were offered as either a standard model or a more powerful and sport 356SC model. Many buyers prefer the 356C, as it featured all the advancements that would come down the line during the history of the 356 lineup.

 

Classic Porsche 356SC:

1964 Porsche 356SCThe 356SC, available in the mid 1960’s, would run alongside the standard 356C but would feature Solex carburetors. At a time when the standard version was offering 75 horsepower with Zenith carburetors, the 356SC would boast more than 90 horsepower.

 

Classic Porsche 911:

1968 Porsche 911Making its debut in 1963, the Porsche 911 offered an air-cooled, six-cylinder engine that was capable of 130hp and a top speed of 131mph. The new generation of Porsche sports cars, the 911 was highly anticipated and celebrated. Several variations were available during the 1960’s including the models listed below.

 

Classic Porsche 911S:

1969 Porsche 911SKnown as the Sport or Super model, the Porsche 911S would debut in 1966 and would boast 160hp. This model was also the first to offer forged alloy wheels from Fuchs, which would become a very popular option. A higher compression ratio, reshaped inlet passages and an additional oil cooler would give the 911S greater reliability and performance. Many appreciate the 911S for its five-speed transmission as well.

 

Classic Porsche 911T:

1968 Porsche 911TThe Porsche 911T would be launched in 1963 and was considered the base model of the time. Popular with buyers who didn’t feel the need for the performance of the 911S, yet didn’t want to give up the sleek and aggressive styling of the 911 would love the 911T. It would also be the first to meet the strict guidelines regarding safety and emissions from the United States.

 

Classic Porsche 911L:

1968 Porsche 911LDuring 1967, the 911L would replace the standard 911 and would run alongside the 911S and the 911T. Characterized by the add-on side marker lights that met U.S. regulations, the 911L would feature minor updates. Nearly identical to its predecessor, Porsche would make this an up-market move and would offer the 911L for $600 more than the previous year’s standard model.

 

Classic Porsche 911E:

1969 Porsche 911EIn 1969, the 911E would replace the short-lived 911L. Very similar visually, the 911E would offer new fuel injection, which would give the 911E more than 140hp. The 911E of the 1960’s would find its place between the entry-level 911T and the high-performance 911S.

 

Classic Porsche 912:

1968 Porsche 912From 1965, buyers who did not need the performance of the 911 could opt for the 912, which offered a four-cylinder engine rather than the six-cylinder of the 911. Easing the transition from the Porsche 356 to the Porsche 911, the 912 would have fewer amenities, less power and less weight, yet would actually outsell the 911 for the first few years of production. Today, the 912 is a great option for buyers for many of the same reasons.

 

If you’re thinking about buying a 1960’s Porsche classic, The Beverly Hills Car Club would be delighted to speak with you and to introduce you to their inventory of classic European and American sports cars. Whether you’re looking for a classic Porsche as your restoration project or your everyday driver, their team has the knowledge, skill and expertise to assist you. In the meantime, be sure to browse their online inventory to view the cars currently available to you. Should you have any questions, they are just a phone call away.

 

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Please contact Alex Manos
Call 310-975-0272
Email alex@beverlyhillscarclub.com


 

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